Smoking and Cancer: The Reality

Smoking and cancer are two words that are often uttered in the same breath. Smoking is known to cause cancer, and it is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States. In this blog post, we will explore the link between smoking and cancer, and discuss some of the statistics associated with this deadly combination. If you are a smoker, or know someone who smokes, please read on – knowledge is power!

Smoking is a known cause of cancer. In fact, smoking is responsible for nearly one in every five deaths in the United States each year. That’s about 480,000 people annually. To put that into perspective, that’s more than car accidents, guns, and HIV/AIDS combined. And those are just the deaths that are directly attributable to smoking – when you factor in indirect deaths (such as those from secondhand smoke), the number jumps to over half a million per year.

Cigarette smoking is linked to several types of cancer, including lung cancer, bladder cancer, and pancreatic cancer. In fact, smoking is thought to cause approximately 90% of all lung cancers. It is also a major risk factor for other cancers, such as head and neck cancers.

Smokers are not only at increased risk for developing cancer, but they are also more likely to die from their disease. In general, smokers with cancer are twice as likely to die from their disease as nonsmokers with cancer. And the older you are when you quit smoking, the greater the benefit – those who quit smoking at age 65 live an average of three years longer than those who continue to smoke.

If you’re a smoker, or know someone who is, quitting is the best thing you can do for your health. Quitting smoking has immediate and long-term benefits, and can add years to your life. If you need help quitting, there are many resources available to you, including your doctor, local hospitals, and national quitlines. So don’t wait – quit today!

Smoking is a known cause of cancer. In fact, smoking is responsible for nearly one in every five deaths in the United States each year. That’s about 480,000 people annually. To put that into perspective, that’s more than car accidents, guns, and HIV/AIDS combined. And those are just the deaths that are directly attributable to smoking – when you factor in indirect deaths (such as those from secondhand smoke), the number jumps to over half a million per year.